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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 16
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. representative howard berman elected in 1982 and served 30 years from the 28th district. representative bob filner sworn in this month as mayor of san diego and served for 20 years. representative laura richardson served for five years from the 37th district. representative pete stark, outgoing dean of our delegation was elected in 1972 and served more than 40 wreers from the 13th district. representative lynn woolsey served for 20 years from the 6th congressional district. much kk said about the distinguished careers of our departing colleagues, but i would like to offer a few remarks of the work i have joined them during their time here in the congress. representative howard berman has served the house for 30 years and i was honored to name him among my closest friends in this body. during his service, he worked on a wide of variety of issues and known as a champion of human rights and standing up for middle class, working class and for the poor in our country. as chair of the foreign affairs committee from 2007 to 2008, mr. berman made great progress on behalf of the less fortunate. he w
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
the privilege and honor to help in his campaign and i have been in san diego with bob, the love and the affection that his constituents have for congressman filner is just really unparalleled. i want to congratulate him for his magnificent win. it was a tough campaign, but he did an unbelievable job and that's because people in his district really knew him and he had provided the level of services that allowed him to be elected now as -- we will call him very soon, mayor filner. joe baca, congressman baca, has been a voice for the poor and underserved during his entire career, not only here in congress but in the california legislature. i was privileged to work with joe on many, many issues, and he has been a consistent voice, both in the california legislature and now here in congress, for protecting low-income families from unfair predatory and credit practices. he has used his seat on the house agricultural committee and house financial services committee to help the most vulnerable americans. he has consistently played a role in raising funding levels for food stamps and nut
: that is a larger issue of taxes and spending cuts. caller: thank you. host: bob on the independent line from florida. caller: nobody should worry about the fiscal cliff. asey have everybody's ira's hostage. ira will have to buy ies.sur they are not worried about the budget. everybody that has an ira basically it will have nothing because interest rates will go up so high on the treasury bills in the coming decade. be heldy's ira will hostage. i took money and i put it into gold. i did not pay any taxes on it. possession is 9/10 of the law. let them come and find it. every politician should not take a paycheck. they do not deserve it. they have been bringing our country down. host: in look at what happened 1st.ing jan. uary host: that will happen in january 1 if congress fails to reach a compromise, even a short-term compromise. dan on the phone from massachusetts. caller: thank you for taking my call. i would like to know how many millionaires there are in this country versus the number of people who make $250,000 and less. i think that's where the argument can bw won e won. john boehner is
from the progressive policy institute. we have senator bob packwood from oregon, former chairman of the senate finance committee, part of the 1986 negotiations. and the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have an hour to an hour and a half. if you hear something you want to weigh in on, don't wait for me. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this issue and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table and would like your thoughts. as you heard from chairman bachus. they need ideas to bridge this gap because we appear to be at a stale mate. i turn it over to john to get your thoughts knowing he has to leave and the center for american progress has come out with some ideas and john maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, i think following up on this morning's session, clearly to have a balanced approach we need
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
with their presence. there's usually two or three of them i see. host: moving on to bob in pennsylvania. bob, how long have you been with the n.r.a.? caller: a long time. host: 10-20 years? caller: 15 years. what kind of guns do you own? caller: guns, shotguns, pistols, and i do own an a.r.-15. host: what do you think about mr. lapierre? caller: i was disappointed. i was anxious to hear the news conference and hopeful n.r.a. would come out with a reasonable response and want to lead in the middle. i believe that it's a good idea to have armed edwards in school. -- armed guards in school. the n.r.a. said they would train these people with an unlimited budget. but they stop way short of -- yes, video games and violence in our society, kids playing on these video games and the movies and the music. when i was young, we were not allowed to watch "the untouchables," eliot with robert because my parents thought it was too violent. my parents thought. and now we've come to this. there's no reason these guns should be available for sale. they have no place in the sporting arena or no place in the hunting aren
in the oregon massacre again at the hands of a gun and a perpetrator that is now dead and to say i thank bob costa for having the courage to get on national tv and speak to those who are rabid sports fans and say it's time for some form of gun regulation. the tragedy that occurred with the nfl player and his girlfriend speaks volumes to the idea of individuals who don't need to have guns in their hands. this phenomenon that guns don't kill, people do, is a trite and redundant and a ridiculous statement. we understand that guns have to have someone at their -- at their trigger, but the idea is with no regulations about those who had previous offenses, no regulations dealing with those who've had mental health issues, no regulations for the gun show loophole that you can go in and buy guns on top of guns, it is time to reflect and i think the sports committee could work with us to assure that america realizes there's nothing wrong withstanding up for gun regulation. let me offer sympathy to the brent and brown families to the nfl family and those concerned about athlete in pro ball, that we c
into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole. we became friends. when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said i am going to be a county clerk, after that i will run for the state house and when there is an opening in congress, that is where i will go. i said, that is a good idea. i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor. when the territory office became available, i ran for that office. when state could came along, i got to congress. -- statehood came along, i got to congress. >> you were in the territorial legislature before you got here. >> two terms in the house and a term in the senate. sparks then you came here as a member of the house. who did you come here with it? >> only one member. you mentioned senator dole and the fact you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it is amazing how some of these relationships were formed before public service. the senator from wyoming house and senate and meeting him when he was a boy scout together. you have a relationship with bob dole. >> the other is phil. the hospital is n
'neill did, the way clinton did with bob dole, and newt gingrich. there is a long history of this. it means people getting into a room and preventing what we all want to prevent, and if we share the same goal, there should be a way for us to reach it. i am sorry that the house yesterday was unable to pass that the resolution, which was obviously a rebuke to their leader, but hopefully over their recess, when the come back after christmas, there will be cooler heads prevail in, and the president will begin serious negotiations. thanks. >> coming up on c-span, the national rifle association ceo. following that, senators feinstein and blumenthal. after that, secretary arnie duncan talks about safety in schools. tomorrow on "washington journal" we look at the so- called disco cliff and other -- fiscal cliff. our guest is stephen dinan. then a look at the colombo and shootings and the recent tragedy in the newtown shootings. washington journal is live here on c-span. >> if you work for him, you sometimes get a generous or overbearing or cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his a
in herndon is here to talk to us about the consequences for small businesses. bob. [applause] hello -- >> hello. i own an embroidery franchise out in herndon, va., and we work for small businesses, schools, corporations. i'm happy to be here today to talk to you about the fiscal cliff and how it might affect my business. i am mostly optimistic about our economy in the future, i have grave concerns about what is going on in congress and the potential fiscal cliff we are facing and the elimination of the tax cuts. a lot of the small business owners i talked to and know are in favor of keeping the tax cuts in place especially for the middle class. we believe in balanced approach and we think it's ok to allow the elimination of the tax cuts for the wealthy. as taxes increase, the taxes at my business will be effected and i will have less to pay for investments and new equipment, hiring new people, but personally my income tax rates will go up. it's already a financially constrained environment. but customers tax rates will go up creating less demand for my products and less revenue for
their meeting with president obama. >> i talked to the republican leader bob this is generally -- about this generally. we had a constructive meeting. i hope something positive will come from that. the republican leader and i and our staffs are working to see what we can come up with. but it should not take a long time to do that. but it would be in everyone's interest if we were in session tomorrow. we have another vote that has been set up >> you were talking about sunday, right? >> yes. we're going to have another caucus a following that, and hopefully by that time we will have made a determination, senator mcconnell and i, and we can do something on the floor in addition to what i talked about. we do need that time to have everybody kind of step back a little bit. if we come up with something, it is not that easy. we're dealing with big numbers. i think it was a very positive meeting. there was not a lot of clarity in the meeting. everyone knows how important it is. -- hilarity in the meeting. everyone knows how important it is. >> i share the view of the majority leader. we had a g
, martin, the chief staff to governor bob mcdonnell. at the end, roxanne white joining us from colorado. so, their full bios are in the pamphlet on your table. >> first, thank you for the report. it provides a good framework to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% in solvent. we did major reform and now we are in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs will go to 22%. to give you a sense of how far behind the war, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we have a right, we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. it is important to get through the litigation. we are very concerned about medicaid costs. they are about 20% of our budget, growing at a rate of 8% per year. we are very engaged in putting everyone in medicaid in an affordable care collaborative. we believe the exchange offers the opportunity for two things. it was largely supported by small businesses in colorado to help them to be able to afford insurance for their employees. there was a very bipart
to the mid 30s. bob dole in the midst of the anti-immigrant sentiment of the 1990s took it back below 30. george w. bush got it back up to the magic 40% that karl rove thought was the jumping off point for neutralizing all of these questions. so, you know, we're talking about a fairly small margin of voters here. so, if you -- you know, a 10% shift in the latino votes moving 1 million to 1.3 million, you know, the actual -- what the turnout is, we don't really know yet. it's going to take a while. the exit poll numbers are losing credibility as time goes on, but that's -- i don't want to get too -- >> yes. >> you know, geeky with you [laughter] a shift to a million voters, million and a half voters, and romney would have been in the mid 30s in terms of his share, and everybody would have said, "that was a pretty good night for a republican." now, what would have happened in terms of actual states, i knew you were going to ask that -- [laughter] >> and then i want to go down the row, getting everyone. >> it's interesting, because it doesn't -- it would have -- i'll leave it to the pundits
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)